everett baker award for lucille bullerwell
Archives, Board, Events, Museum

Lucille Receives Baker Award

On Saturday, September 10, the Saskatchewan History and Folklore Society (SHFS) recognized Lucille Bullerwell’s longtime commitment to the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum by awarding her the 2022 Everett Baker Award for Saskatchewan Heritage.

everett baker award for lucille bullerwell
2022 Everett Baker Award for Saskatchewan Heritage awarded to Lucille Bullerwell

Everett Baker, the SHFS’ first President, was a firm believer in promoting the past to build a better future, and worked tirelessly to preserve local history. In that spirit, the Baker Award recognizes individuals, groups, or organizations who have gone “above and beyond” to preserve and promote Saskatchewan heritage.

From the SHFS:

It is our very great pleasure to announce that the winner of the 2022 Everett Baker Award for Saskatchewan Heritage is Lucille Bullerwell!

Lucille has dedicated more than 25 years of her life to growing and maintaining the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum and Archives to preserve the history of the Cut Knife area.

After assisting Elizabeth McLain, the museum’s original Volunteer Curator, for approximately 8 years, Lucille took on the role of Volunteer Curator in 2003. Lucille held the position of Volunteer Curator from 2003 to 2013. At that time, she retired as Curator but stayed as a Board Trustee. In 2014, she left the Board and now continues to volunteer, oversee curatorial tasks, and mentor the CMMM’s seasonal Museum Manager (hired in 2016).

Lucille’s contributions to the success of the museum have been substantial. Her role included all aspects of collections management (development, storage, and preservation of artifacts and archival materials) and exhibit management (designing, budgeting, constructing, and staging exhibits).

She has ensured the preservation of the collections, displays, and exhibits by proactively developing policy and practices to incorporate and adhere to museum and archives industry standards. She established the CMMM Archives in 2009 under the guidance of the Saskatchewan Council of Archives and Archivists (SCAA), bringing all archival materials under one roof and one set of policies.

Lucille created a First Nations Elders Advisory Board to ensure proper care and handling of First Nations’ artifacts, and to facilitate the repatriation process of these artifacts, as requested.

She established the museum’s online presence with a website, expanded the website’s reach via social media, and made the website an online resource through digital exhibits. She has increased the museum’s exposure to new audiences through tourism initiatives, networking opportunities, and community partnerships.

Lucille’s long-time volunteer commitment to preserving and promoting heritage at the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum is truly “above and beyond.”

Congratulations, Lucille!

Saskatchewan History and Folklore Society

Lucille was honoured to receive the award. She insisted that “no one does this alone” and acknowledged all of the support, assistance and encouragement she’d received over the years from the Cut Knife community, the Town and R.M. of Cut Knife, CMMM staff and volunteers, Elder Advisors, Wendy Fitch and the Museum’s Association of Saskatchewan, and Sask Culture.

Lucille’s nomination package was submitted by the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum and Archives’ Board of Trustees.

~ Debbie M.

Events, Museum

11. The Town of Cut Knife Centennial

On Sunday, July 17 the museum hosted “Quilt Walk”, an indoor / outdoor exhibit that included heritage quilts from the CMMM collections and more recent items created by local crafters. For those of you who weren’t able to attend, we’d like to show you, over the next week or so, the beautiful handiwork we had on display.


The Town of Cut Knife celebrated its 100th Anniversary in 2012 with the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum being central to many of the festivities. Dozens of volunteers worked for many months researching (see Cut Knife Town Centre), creating exhibits and displays, and then hosting visitors on that Canada Day weekend.

The Centennial Quilt was on display in the foyer of the Duvall House during the July 17th Quilt Walk but its information tag had not been attached at the time this picture was taken.

Submitted by the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum

A WOMAN’S LIFE WHILE TRAVELING WEST

Excerpt from “Timeline of Quilting History” compiled and written by the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum:

Despite misgivings, most pioneer women proved to be hardy and determined. It would be a long wearisome trip, going 9 – 12 miles each day, and taking several months for those going to the west coast regions. If a woman had not yet cast away her ideas of what a proper nineteenth-century woman should do, she would quickly find she had no choice. Although her womanly skills of cooking, sewing, mending, and child care were as important as ever, she was soon pressed into such tasks as gathering wood or buffalo chips for evening fires, pitching tents and driving stock.

The wagon ride was uncomfortable and jolting, and more often women and children walked alongside the wagons. Needless to say, little quilting was done on the trail. A few women managed to piece some quilt blocks or perhaps a whole quilt top, but more often women knitted or mended clothing during the short breaks and occasional layovers. Any fine sewing would have been impossible while traveling and difficult in the poor light of a camp fire….

Arriving in the new land did not immediately change life much especially for the early settlers in a region. The family still had to live in tents, the wagon or a crude lean to until a log cabin or sod house could be built. It took a few years to establish first a farm, and then a home. These years were often difficult and lonely.

CLAYTON MCLAIN MEMORIAL MUSEUM (ALL RIGHTS RESERVED)
Events, McLain Family, Museum

10. The McLain Family Heirloom

On Sunday, July 17 the museum hosted “Quilt Walk”, an indoor / outdoor exhibit that included heritage quilts from the CMMM collections and more recent items created by local crafters. For those of you who weren’t able to attend, we’d like to show you, over the next week or so, the beautiful handiwork we had on display.


From CMMM, 1979.H.141:

This hand-made quilt was a wedding gift from William Thomas Transou and Mary Jane Transou (Ellis) to Robert and Luna McLain in 1917. The quilt was made by Luna’s mother, Mary Jane.

mclain family heirloom quilt
Created by Mary Jane Transou

NOTES ON QUILTING

Excerpt from “Timeline of Quilting History” compiled and written by the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum:

Quilts are often made to commemorate events (i.e. weddings and births) and can incorporate pieces of fabric from used or worn-out clothing. Such quilts become historical documents for the quilt-maker and his or her loved ones.

CLAYTON MCLAIN MEMORIAL MUSEUM (ALL RIGHTS RESERVED)
Events, Museum

9. An Experiment with Textures

On Sunday, July 17 the museum hosted “Quilt Walk”, an indoor / outdoor exhibit that included heritage quilts from the CMMM collections and more recent items created by local crafters. For those of you who weren’t able to attend, we’d like to show you, over the next week or so, the beautiful handiwork we had on display.


From Terri Paziuk:

Crafted by Terri Paziuk in 2018 from a design by Barb Perrino. Terri explained that she created this quilt to experiment with a variety of fabric textures. Difficult to see in these photos, but very interesting to view up close.

crafters label on back of quilt
Crafted by Terri Paziuk
Submitted by Terri Paziuk

MORE ON ART QUILTS

Excerpt from “Timeline of Quilting History” compiled and written by the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum (all rights reserved):

  • Art quilting is a style in which the quilt may look like an impressionistic painting.
  • Photo transfers on quilts and fusible designs: With photo transfer, the actual photographs are printed on fabric with a computer. (There are some amazing quilts that show the stages of a person’s life using this method.)
  • Pictorial quilting entails making a quilt entirely of fabric that ends up looking like a photograph. People take a photo, then recreate it on fabric down to the last detail.
Events, Museum

8. The Modern Era

On Sunday, July 17 the museum hosted “Quilt Walk”, an indoor / outdoor exhibit that included heritage quilts from the CMMM collections and more recent items created by local crafters. For those of you who weren’t able to attend, we’d like to show you, over the next week or so, the beautiful handiwork we had on display.


From Lucille Bullerwell:

This was the first quilt that I made. I was ‘into’ houses for decorating my home and ordered the pattern from an American magazine. Crafted by Lucille Bullerwell in 1982.

quilted for wall hanging
Crafted by Lucille Bullerwell

NOTES ON QUILTING

Excerpt from “Timeline of Quilting History” compiled and written by the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum:

In modern times, art quilts have started to become popular for their aesthetic and artistic qualities, rather than for functionality (i.e. they may hang on a wall instead of lying on a bed).

CLAYTON MCLAIN MEMORIAL MUSEUM (ALL RIGHTS RESERVED)