Fundraiser, Museum

New Arrivals

Sending out many thanks to Lorraine Martin, author of Notes and Clippings – It All Started in Saskatchewan. Twelve copies of her book have just arrived in the mail, and will soon be for sale at the Museum.

ABOUT THE BOOK

My story starts with my early life in the Gallivan/Cut Knife area in the early 1940 and 1950’s. It continues through my training as a Psychiatric Nurse at the North Battleford Provincial Hospital then after graduation my working years in England and Switzerland followed by travelling throughout Europe. Returning to Canada I worked in Nova Scotia and Regina where I married and became a volunteer.

Lorraine Martin
“Notes and Clippings” arrive in the mail

~ Debbie M.

Museum

Have You Seen These Yet?

Last year, Lucille had a wonderful idea. She wanted to have ordinary photos of the Museum buildings transferred to canvas for posterity. Happily, we’ve begun that process. Visitors to the Duvall House are now able to view six canvas prints: an aerial view of the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum grounds, four heritage buildings still standing, and Ovenstown, the first building to be moved on site, now demolished.

If you haven’t been to the CMMM yet this year, Angie will be taking tours until the end of the month, and Coffee will be served at the Duvall House on Wednesday and Friday afternoons until September 2.

If you have had a chance to view these canvas prints in person, then you’ll agree that the photos below just do not do them justice.

aerial view museum grounds canvas print
Aerial view of the Museum
raymond's store canvas print
Raymond’s Store
ovenstown canvas print
Ovenstown
station canvas print
Station
duvall house canvas print
Duvall House
clayton's van canvas print
Clayton’s Display Van

~ Debbie M.

Events, Museum

11. The Town of Cut Knife Centennial

On Sunday, July 17 the museum hosted “Quilt Walk”, an indoor / outdoor exhibit that included heritage quilts from the CMMM collections and more recent items created by local crafters. For those of you who weren’t able to attend, we’d like to show you, over the next week or so, the beautiful handiwork we had on display.


The Town of Cut Knife celebrated its 100th Anniversary in 2012 with the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum being central to many of the festivities. Dozens of volunteers worked for many months researching (see Cut Knife Town Centre), creating exhibits and displays, and then hosting visitors on that Canada Day weekend.

The Centennial Quilt was on display in the foyer of the Duvall House during the July 17th Quilt Walk but its information tag had not been attached at the time this picture was taken.

Submitted by the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum

A WOMAN’S LIFE WHILE TRAVELING WEST

Excerpt from “Timeline of Quilting History” compiled and written by the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum:

Despite misgivings, most pioneer women proved to be hardy and determined. It would be a long wearisome trip, going 9 – 12 miles each day, and taking several months for those going to the west coast regions. If a woman had not yet cast away her ideas of what a proper nineteenth-century woman should do, she would quickly find she had no choice. Although her womanly skills of cooking, sewing, mending, and child care were as important as ever, she was soon pressed into such tasks as gathering wood or buffalo chips for evening fires, pitching tents and driving stock.

The wagon ride was uncomfortable and jolting, and more often women and children walked alongside the wagons. Needless to say, little quilting was done on the trail. A few women managed to piece some quilt blocks or perhaps a whole quilt top, but more often women knitted or mended clothing during the short breaks and occasional layovers. Any fine sewing would have been impossible while traveling and difficult in the poor light of a camp fire….

Arriving in the new land did not immediately change life much especially for the early settlers in a region. The family still had to live in tents, the wagon or a crude lean to until a log cabin or sod house could be built. It took a few years to establish first a farm, and then a home. These years were often difficult and lonely.

CLAYTON MCLAIN MEMORIAL MUSEUM (ALL RIGHTS RESERVED)
Events, McLain Family, Museum

10. The McLain Family Heirloom

On Sunday, July 17 the museum hosted “Quilt Walk”, an indoor / outdoor exhibit that included heritage quilts from the CMMM collections and more recent items created by local crafters. For those of you who weren’t able to attend, we’d like to show you, over the next week or so, the beautiful handiwork we had on display.


From CMMM, 1979.H.141:

This hand-made quilt was a wedding gift from William Thomas Transou and Mary Jane Transou (Ellis) to Robert and Luna McLain in 1917. The quilt was made by Luna’s mother, Mary Jane.

mclain family heirloom quilt
Created by Mary Jane Transou

NOTES ON QUILTING

Excerpt from “Timeline of Quilting History” compiled and written by the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum:

Quilts are often made to commemorate events (i.e. weddings and births) and can incorporate pieces of fabric from used or worn-out clothing. Such quilts become historical documents for the quilt-maker and his or her loved ones.

CLAYTON MCLAIN MEMORIAL MUSEUM (ALL RIGHTS RESERVED)
Events, Museum

9. An Experiment with Textures

On Sunday, July 17 the museum hosted “Quilt Walk”, an indoor / outdoor exhibit that included heritage quilts from the CMMM collections and more recent items created by local crafters. For those of you who weren’t able to attend, we’d like to show you, over the next week or so, the beautiful handiwork we had on display.


From Terri Paziuk:

Crafted by Terri Paziuk in 2018 from a design by Barb Perrino. Terri explained that she created this quilt to experiment with a variety of fabric textures. Difficult to see in these photos, but very interesting to view up close.

crafters label on back of quilt
Crafted by Terri Paziuk
Submitted by Terri Paziuk

MORE ON ART QUILTS

Excerpt from “Timeline of Quilting History” compiled and written by the Clayton McLain Memorial Museum (all rights reserved):

  • Art quilting is a style in which the quilt may look like an impressionistic painting.
  • Photo transfers on quilts and fusible designs: With photo transfer, the actual photographs are printed on fabric with a computer. (There are some amazing quilts that show the stages of a person’s life using this method.)
  • Pictorial quilting entails making a quilt entirely of fabric that ends up looking like a photograph. People take a photo, then recreate it on fabric down to the last detail.